Neuroscience

Articles and news from the latest research reports.

Posts tagged DNA

98 notes

DNA damage may cause ALS
New study finds link between neurons’ inability to repair DNA and neurodegeneration.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease — is a neurodegenerative disease that destroys the neurons that control muscle movement. There is no cure for ALS, which kills most patients within three to five years of the onset of symptoms, and about 5,600 new cases are diagnosed in the United States each year.
MIT neuroscientists have found new evidence that suggests that a failure to repair damaged DNA could underlie not only ALS, but also other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. These findings imply that drugs that bolster neurons’ DNA-repair capacity could help ALS patients, says Li-Huei Tsai, director of MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and senior author of a paper describing the ALS findings in the Sept. 15 issue of Nature Neuroscience.
Neurons are some of the longest-living cells in the human body. While other cells are frequently replaced, our neurons are generally retained throughout our lifetimes. Consequently, neurons can accrue a lot of DNA damage and are especially vulnerable to its effects.
“Our genome is constantly under attack and DNA strand breaks are produced all the time. Fortunately, they are not a worry because we have the machinery to repair it right away. But if this repair machinery were to somehow become compromised, then it could be very devastating for neurons,” Tsai says.
Lead authors of the paper are Picower Institute postdoc Wen-Yuan Wang and research scientist Ling Pan.
Impaired repair
Tsai’s group has been interested in understanding the importance of DNA repair in neurodegenerative processes for several years. In a study published in 2008, they reported that DNA double-strand breaks precede neuronal loss in a mouse model that undergoes Alzheimer’s disease-like neurodegeneration and identified a protein, HDAC1, which prevents neuronal loss under these conditions. 
HDAC1 is a histone deacetylase, an enzyme that regulates genes by modifying chromatin, which consists of DNA wrapped around a core of proteins called histones. HDAC1 activity normally causes DNA to wrap more tightly around histones, preventing gene expression. However, it turns out that cells, including neurons, also exploit HDAC1’s ability to tighten up chromatin to stabilize broken DNA ends and promote their repair.
In a paper published earlier this year in Nature Neuroscience, Tsai’s team reported that HDAC1 works cooperatively with another deacetylase called SIRT1 to repair DNA and prevent the accumulation of damage that could promote neurodegeneration.
When a neuron suffers double-strand breaks, SIRT1 migrates within seconds to the damaged sites, where it soon recruits HDAC1 and other repair factors. SIRT1 also stimulates the enzymatic activity of HDAC1, which allows the broken DNA ends to be resealed.
SIRT1 itself has recently gained notoriety as the protein that promotes longevity and protects against diseases including diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, and Tsai’s group believes that its role in DNA repair contributes significantly to the protective effects of SIRT1.
In an attempt to further unveil other partners that work with HDAC1 to repair DNA, Tsai and colleagues stumbled upon a protein called Fused In Sarcoma (FUS). This finding was intriguing, Tsai says, because the FUS gene is one of the most common sites of mutations that cause inherited forms of ALS.
The MIT team found that FUS appears at the scene of DNA damage very rapidly, suggesting that FUS is orchestrating the repair response. One of its roles is to recruit HDAC1 to the DNA damage site. Without it, HDAC1 does not appear and the necessary repair does not occur. Tsai believes that FUS may also be involved in sensing when DNA damage has occurred.
Linking mutation and disease
At least 50 mutations in the FUS gene have been found to cause ALS. The majority of these mutations occur in two sections of the FUS protein. The MIT team mapped the interactions between FUS and HDAC1 and found that these same two sections of the FUS protein bind to HDAC1.
They also generated four FUS mutants that are most commonly seen in ALS patients. When they replaced the normal FUS with these mutants, they found that the interaction with HDAC1 was impaired and DNA damage was significantly increased. This suggests that those mutations prevent FUS from recruiting HDAC1 when DNA damage occurs, allowing damage to accumulate and eventually leading to ALS.
The researchers also analyzed brain tissue samples from ALS patients harboring FUS mutations and found that the amount of DNA damage in neurons in motor cortex was about double that found in normal brain tissue.
ALS patients with FUS mutations usually develop the disease early, before age 40. Only one of a person’s two copies of the FUS gene needs to be mutated to produce the disease. Tsai says that early in life, having one copy of the normal FUS gene may be enough to keep DNA repair going. “With aging, eventually the machinery is compromised and it contributes to neuronal demise,” she says.
The findings suggest that drugs that promote DNA damage repair, including activators of HDAC1 and SIRT1, could help combat the effects of ALS. SIRT1 activators are now being developed and have entered clinical trials to treat diabetes.
“There are numerous human inherited DNA-repair deficiency syndromes, many of which show neurodegeneration or other neurological defects. This new study now extends the spectrum of neuropathology caused by defects in DNA maintenance to include ALS,” says Peter McKinnon, a professor of genetics at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital who was not part of the research team. “This study offers new avenues to explore in the quest for treatment strategies.”
Tsai’s lab is now studying whether there is a direct relationship between FUS and SIRT1. She also wants to determine whether the DNA damage that occurs in ALS patients after FUS is lost occurs in certain “hotspots” or is random. “I would speculate that there’s got to be hotspots in terms of where the DNA is damaged. But right now it remains speculation,” she says. “We really need to do the experiments and demonstrate whether that’s the case.”

DNA damage may cause ALS

New study finds link between neurons’ inability to repair DNA and neurodegeneration.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease — is a neurodegenerative disease that destroys the neurons that control muscle movement. There is no cure for ALS, which kills most patients within three to five years of the onset of symptoms, and about 5,600 new cases are diagnosed in the United States each year.

MIT neuroscientists have found new evidence that suggests that a failure to repair damaged DNA could underlie not only ALS, but also other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. These findings imply that drugs that bolster neurons’ DNA-repair capacity could help ALS patients, says Li-Huei Tsai, director of MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and senior author of a paper describing the ALS findings in the Sept. 15 issue of Nature Neuroscience.

Neurons are some of the longest-living cells in the human body. While other cells are frequently replaced, our neurons are generally retained throughout our lifetimes. Consequently, neurons can accrue a lot of DNA damage and are especially vulnerable to its effects.

“Our genome is constantly under attack and DNA strand breaks are produced all the time. Fortunately, they are not a worry because we have the machinery to repair it right away. But if this repair machinery were to somehow become compromised, then it could be very devastating for neurons,” Tsai says.

Lead authors of the paper are Picower Institute postdoc Wen-Yuan Wang and research scientist Ling Pan.

Impaired repair

Tsai’s group has been interested in understanding the importance of DNA repair in neurodegenerative processes for several years. In a study published in 2008, they reported that DNA double-strand breaks precede neuronal loss in a mouse model that undergoes Alzheimer’s disease-like neurodegeneration and identified a protein, HDAC1, which prevents neuronal loss under these conditions. 

HDAC1 is a histone deacetylase, an enzyme that regulates genes by modifying chromatin, which consists of DNA wrapped around a core of proteins called histones. HDAC1 activity normally causes DNA to wrap more tightly around histones, preventing gene expression. However, it turns out that cells, including neurons, also exploit HDAC1’s ability to tighten up chromatin to stabilize broken DNA ends and promote their repair.

In a paper published earlier this year in Nature Neuroscience, Tsai’s team reported that HDAC1 works cooperatively with another deacetylase called SIRT1 to repair DNA and prevent the accumulation of damage that could promote neurodegeneration.

When a neuron suffers double-strand breaks, SIRT1 migrates within seconds to the damaged sites, where it soon recruits HDAC1 and other repair factors. SIRT1 also stimulates the enzymatic activity of HDAC1, which allows the broken DNA ends to be resealed.

SIRT1 itself has recently gained notoriety as the protein that promotes longevity and protects against diseases including diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, and Tsai’s group believes that its role in DNA repair contributes significantly to the protective effects of SIRT1.

In an attempt to further unveil other partners that work with HDAC1 to repair DNA, Tsai and colleagues stumbled upon a protein called Fused In Sarcoma (FUS). This finding was intriguing, Tsai says, because the FUS gene is one of the most common sites of mutations that cause inherited forms of ALS.

The MIT team found that FUS appears at the scene of DNA damage very rapidly, suggesting that FUS is orchestrating the repair response. One of its roles is to recruit HDAC1 to the DNA damage site. Without it, HDAC1 does not appear and the necessary repair does not occur. Tsai believes that FUS may also be involved in sensing when DNA damage has occurred.

Linking mutation and disease

At least 50 mutations in the FUS gene have been found to cause ALS. The majority of these mutations occur in two sections of the FUS protein. The MIT team mapped the interactions between FUS and HDAC1 and found that these same two sections of the FUS protein bind to HDAC1.

They also generated four FUS mutants that are most commonly seen in ALS patients. When they replaced the normal FUS with these mutants, they found that the interaction with HDAC1 was impaired and DNA damage was significantly increased. This suggests that those mutations prevent FUS from recruiting HDAC1 when DNA damage occurs, allowing damage to accumulate and eventually leading to ALS.

The researchers also analyzed brain tissue samples from ALS patients harboring FUS mutations and found that the amount of DNA damage in neurons in motor cortex was about double that found in normal brain tissue.

ALS patients with FUS mutations usually develop the disease early, before age 40. Only one of a person’s two copies of the FUS gene needs to be mutated to produce the disease. Tsai says that early in life, having one copy of the normal FUS gene may be enough to keep DNA repair going. “With aging, eventually the machinery is compromised and it contributes to neuronal demise,” she says.

The findings suggest that drugs that promote DNA damage repair, including activators of HDAC1 and SIRT1, could help combat the effects of ALS. SIRT1 activators are now being developed and have entered clinical trials to treat diabetes.

“There are numerous human inherited DNA-repair deficiency syndromes, many of which show neurodegeneration or other neurological defects. This new study now extends the spectrum of neuropathology caused by defects in DNA maintenance to include ALS,” says Peter McKinnon, a professor of genetics at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital who was not part of the research team. “This study offers new avenues to explore in the quest for treatment strategies.”

Tsai’s lab is now studying whether there is a direct relationship between FUS and SIRT1. She also wants to determine whether the DNA damage that occurs in ALS patients after FUS is lost occurs in certain “hotspots” or is random. “I would speculate that there’s got to be hotspots in terms of where the DNA is damaged. But right now it remains speculation,” she says. “We really need to do the experiments and demonstrate whether that’s the case.”

Filed under ALS neurodegenerative diseases DNA damage HDAC1 SIRT1 FUS gene DNA neuroscience science

112 notes

Autism Linked to Increased Genetic Change in Regions of Genome Instability
Children with autism have increased levels of genetic change in regions of the genome prone to DNA rearrangements, so called “hotspots,” according to a research discovery to be published in the print edition of the journal Human Molecular Genetics. The research indicates that these genetic changes come in the form of an excess of duplicated DNA segments in hotspot regions and may affect the chances that a child will develop autism — a behavioral disorder that affects about 1 of every 88 children in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control.
Earlier work had identified, in children with autism, a greater frequency of rare DNA deletions or duplications, known as DNA copy number changes. These rare and harmful events are found in approximately 5 to 10 percent of cases, raising the question as to what other genetic changes might contribute to the disorders known as autism spectrum disorders.
The new research shows that children with autism have — in addition to these rare events — an excess of duplicated DNA including more common variants not exclusively found in children with autism, but are found at elevated levels compared to typically developing children. The research collaboration includes groups led at Penn State by Scott Selleck; at the University of California Davis/MIND Institute by Isaac Pessah, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Flora Tassone, and Robin Hansen; and at the University of Washington by Evan Eichler.
The investigators also found that the balance of DNA duplications and deletions in children with autism was different from that found in more severe developmental disorders, such as intellectual disability or multiple congenital anomalies, where the levels of both deletions and duplications are increased compared to controls, and are even higher than in children with autism.
They also found that children who had more difficulty with daily living skills also had the greatest level of copy number change throughout their genome. “These measures of adaptive behavior provide an indication of the severity of the impairment in the children with autism. These behaviors were significantly correlated with the amount of DNA copy number change,” Selleck said, emphasizing that the research revealed “clear and graded effects of the genetic change.”
"These results beg the question as to the origin of this genetic change," Selleck said. "The increased levels of both rare and common variants suggests the possibility that these individuals are predisposed to genetic alteration."
A vigorous debate is ongoing in the research community about the degree of genetic versus environmental contributions to autism. Selleck said the finding of an overall increase in genetic change in children with autism heightens the need to search for the basis of this variation. “We know that environmental factors can affect the stability of the genome, but we don’t know if the DNA copy number change we detect in these children is a result of environmental exposures, nutrition, medical factors, lifestyle, genetic susceptibility, or combinations of many elements together,” Selleck said. “The elevated levels of common variants is telling us something. It suggests that pure selection of randomly generated variants may not be the whole story.”
The Penn State team includes Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Associate Professor Marylyn Ritchie and Assistant Professor Santhosh Girirajan. “The relationship between the level of copy number change and the degree of neurodevelopmental disability is something we have noted previously for large, rare variants” says Girirajan, “but this work extends those observations to common copy number variants, suggesting the level of copy number change in children with autism is larger than we had appreciated.” Girirajan, the first author of the study, coordinated the effort between the Penn State and University of Washington researchers.

Autism Linked to Increased Genetic Change in Regions of Genome Instability

Children with autism have increased levels of genetic change in regions of the genome prone to DNA rearrangements, so called “hotspots,” according to a research discovery to be published in the print edition of the journal Human Molecular Genetics. The research indicates that these genetic changes come in the form of an excess of duplicated DNA segments in hotspot regions and may affect the chances that a child will develop autism — a behavioral disorder that affects about 1 of every 88 children in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Earlier work had identified, in children with autism, a greater frequency of rare DNA deletions or duplications, known as DNA copy number changes. These rare and harmful events are found in approximately 5 to 10 percent of cases, raising the question as to what other genetic changes might contribute to the disorders known as autism spectrum disorders.

The new research shows that children with autism have — in addition to these rare events — an excess of duplicated DNA including more common variants not exclusively found in children with autism, but are found at elevated levels compared to typically developing children. The research collaboration includes groups led at Penn State by Scott Selleck; at the University of California Davis/MIND Institute by Isaac Pessah, Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Flora Tassone, and Robin Hansen; and at the University of Washington by Evan Eichler.

The investigators also found that the balance of DNA duplications and deletions in children with autism was different from that found in more severe developmental disorders, such as intellectual disability or multiple congenital anomalies, where the levels of both deletions and duplications are increased compared to controls, and are even higher than in children with autism.

They also found that children who had more difficulty with daily living skills also had the greatest level of copy number change throughout their genome. “These measures of adaptive behavior provide an indication of the severity of the impairment in the children with autism. These behaviors were significantly correlated with the amount of DNA copy number change,” Selleck said, emphasizing that the research revealed “clear and graded effects of the genetic change.”

"These results beg the question as to the origin of this genetic change," Selleck said. "The increased levels of both rare and common variants suggests the possibility that these individuals are predisposed to genetic alteration."

A vigorous debate is ongoing in the research community about the degree of genetic versus environmental contributions to autism. Selleck said the finding of an overall increase in genetic change in children with autism heightens the need to search for the basis of this variation. “We know that environmental factors can affect the stability of the genome, but we don’t know if the DNA copy number change we detect in these children is a result of environmental exposures, nutrition, medical factors, lifestyle, genetic susceptibility, or combinations of many elements together,” Selleck said. “The elevated levels of common variants is telling us something. It suggests that pure selection of randomly generated variants may not be the whole story.”

The Penn State team includes Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Associate Professor Marylyn Ritchie and Assistant Professor Santhosh Girirajan. “The relationship between the level of copy number change and the degree of neurodevelopmental disability is something we have noted previously for large, rare variants” says Girirajan, “but this work extends those observations to common copy number variants, suggesting the level of copy number change in children with autism is larger than we had appreciated.” Girirajan, the first author of the study, coordinated the effort between the Penn State and University of Washington researchers.

Filed under ASD autism DNA DNA duplications hotspot regions congenital anomalies genomics neuroscience science

219 notes

Scientists discover how epigenetic information could be inherited
New research reveals a potential way for how parents’ experiences could be passed to their offspring’s genes. The research was published in the journal Science.
Epigenetics is a system that turns our genes on and off. The process works by chemical tags, known as epigenetic marks, attaching to DNA and telling a cell to either use or ignore a particular gene.
The most common epigenetic mark is a methyl group. When these groups fasten to DNA through a process called methylation they block the attachment of proteins which normally turn the genes on. As a result, the gene is turned off.
Scientists have witnessed epigenetic inheritance, the observation that offspring may inherit altered traits due to their parents’ past experiences. For example, historical incidences of famine have resulted in health effects on the children and grandchildren of individuals who had restricted diets, possibly because of inheritance of altered epigenetic marks caused by a restricted diet.
However, it is thought that between each generation the epigenetic marks are erased in cells called primordial gene cells (PGC), the precursors to sperm and eggs. This ‘reprogramming’ allows all genes to be read afresh for each new person – leaving scientists to question how epigenetic inheritance could occur.
The new Cambridge study initially discovered how the DNA methylation marks are erased in PGCs, a question that has been under intense investigation over the past 10 years. The methylation marks are converted to hydroxymethylation which is then progressively diluted out as the cells divide. This process turns out to be remarkably efficient and seems to reset the genes for each new generation. Understanding the mechanism of epigenetic resetting could be exploited to deal with adult diseases linked with an accumulation of aberrant epigenetic marks, such as cancers, or in ‘rejuvenating’ aged cells.
However, the researchers, who were funded by the Wellcome Trust, also found that some rare methylation can ‘escape’ the reprogramming process and can thus be passed on to offspring – revealing how epigenetic inheritance could occur. This is important because aberrant methylation could accumulate at genes during a lifetime in response to environmental factors, such as chemical exposure or nutrition, and can cause abnormal use of genes, leading to disease. If these marks are then inherited by offspring, their genes could also be affected.

Scientists discover how epigenetic information could be inherited

New research reveals a potential way for how parents’ experiences could be passed to their offspring’s genes. The research was published in the journal Science.

Epigenetics is a system that turns our genes on and off. The process works by chemical tags, known as epigenetic marks, attaching to DNA and telling a cell to either use or ignore a particular gene.

The most common epigenetic mark is a methyl group. When these groups fasten to DNA through a process called methylation they block the attachment of proteins which normally turn the genes on. As a result, the gene is turned off.

Scientists have witnessed epigenetic inheritance, the observation that offspring may inherit altered traits due to their parents’ past experiences. For example, historical incidences of famine have resulted in health effects on the children and grandchildren of individuals who had restricted diets, possibly because of inheritance of altered epigenetic marks caused by a restricted diet.

However, it is thought that between each generation the epigenetic marks are erased in cells called primordial gene cells (PGC), the precursors to sperm and eggs. This ‘reprogramming’ allows all genes to be read afresh for each new person – leaving scientists to question how epigenetic inheritance could occur.

The new Cambridge study initially discovered how the DNA methylation marks are erased in PGCs, a question that has been under intense investigation over the past 10 years. The methylation marks are converted to hydroxymethylation which is then progressively diluted out as the cells divide. This process turns out to be remarkably efficient and seems to reset the genes for each new generation. Understanding the mechanism of epigenetic resetting could be exploited to deal with adult diseases linked with an accumulation of aberrant epigenetic marks, such as cancers, or in ‘rejuvenating’ aged cells.

However, the researchers, who were funded by the Wellcome Trust, also found that some rare methylation can ‘escape’ the reprogramming process and can thus be passed on to offspring – revealing how epigenetic inheritance could occur. This is important because aberrant methylation could accumulate at genes during a lifetime in response to environmental factors, such as chemical exposure or nutrition, and can cause abnormal use of genes, leading to disease. If these marks are then inherited by offspring, their genes could also be affected.

Filed under epigenetics genes inheritance DNA primordial gene cells DNA methylation science

153 notes

Four-stranded ‘quadruple helix’ DNA structure proven to exist in human cells
In 1953, Cambridge researchers Watson and Crick published a paper describing the interweaving ‘double helix’ DNA structure – the chemical code for all life.
Now, in the year of that scientific landmark’s 60th Anniversary, Cambridge researchers have published a paper proving that four-stranded ‘quadruple helix’ DNA structures – known as G-quadruplexes – also exist within the human genome. They form in regions of DNA that are rich in the building block guanine, usually abbreviated to ‘G’.
The findings mark the culmination of over 10 years investigation by scientists to show these complex structures in vivo – in living human cells – working from the hypothetical, through computational modelling to synthetic lab experiments and finally the identification in human cancer cells using fluorescent biomarkers.
The research, published in Nature Chemistry and funded by Cancer Research UK, goes on to show clear links between concentrations of four-stranded quadruplexes and the process of DNA replication, which is pivotal to cell division and production.

Four-stranded ‘quadruple helix’ DNA structure proven to exist in human cells

In 1953, Cambridge researchers Watson and Crick published a paper describing the interweaving ‘double helix’ DNA structure – the chemical code for all life.

Now, in the year of that scientific landmark’s 60th Anniversary, Cambridge researchers have published a paper proving that four-stranded ‘quadruple helix’ DNA structures – known as G-quadruplexes – also exist within the human genome. They form in regions of DNA that are rich in the building block guanine, usually abbreviated to ‘G’.

The findings mark the culmination of over 10 years investigation by scientists to show these complex structures in vivo – in living human cells – working from the hypothetical, through computational modelling to synthetic lab experiments and finally the identification in human cancer cells using fluorescent biomarkers.

The research, published in Nature Chemistry and funded by Cancer Research UK, goes on to show clear links between concentrations of four-stranded quadruplexes and the process of DNA replication, which is pivotal to cell division and production.

Filed under cells cancer genetics DNA quadruple helix cell cultures science

69 notes

Cheap and easy technique to snip DNA could revolutionize gene therapy
A simple, precise and inexpensive method for cutting DNA to insert genes into human cells could transform genetic medicine, making routine what now are expensive, complicated and rare procedures for replacing defective genes in order to fix genetic disease or even cure AIDS.
Discovered last year by Jennifer Doudna and Martin Jinek of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of California, Berkeley, and Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine-Sweden, the technique was labeled a “tour de force” in a 2012 review in the journal Nature Biotechnology.
That review was based solely on the team’s June 28, 2012, Science paper, in which the researchers described a new method of precisely targeting and cutting DNA in bacteria.
Two new papers published last week in the journal Science Express (1 , 2) demonstrate that the technique also works in human cells. A paper by Doudna and her team reporting similarly successful results in human cells has been accepted for publication by the new open-access journal eLife.
“The ability to modify specific elements of an organism’s genes has been essential to advance our understanding of biology, including human health,” said Doudna, a professor of molecular and cell biology and of chemistry and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator at UC Berkeley. “However, the techniques for making these modifications in animals and humans have been a huge bottleneck in both research and the development of human therapeutics.
“This is going to remove a major bottleneck in the field, because it means that essentially anybody can use this kind of genome editing or reprogramming to introduce genetic changes into mammalian or, quite likely, other eukaryotic systems.”
“I think this is going to be a real hit,” said George Church, professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and principal author of one of the Science Express papers. “There are going to be a lot of people practicing this method because it is easier and about 100 times more compact than other techniques.”
“Based on the feedback we’ve received, it’s possible that this technique will completely revolutionize genome engineering in animals and plants,” said Doudna, who also holds an appointment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. “It’s easy to program and could potentially be as powerful as the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).”
The latter technique made it easy to generate millions of copies of small pieces of DNA and permanently altered biological research and medical genetics.

Cheap and easy technique to snip DNA could revolutionize gene therapy

A simple, precise and inexpensive method for cutting DNA to insert genes into human cells could transform genetic medicine, making routine what now are expensive, complicated and rare procedures for replacing defective genes in order to fix genetic disease or even cure AIDS.

Discovered last year by Jennifer Doudna and Martin Jinek of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of California, Berkeley, and Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine-Sweden, the technique was labeled a “tour de force” in a 2012 review in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

That review was based solely on the team’s June 28, 2012, Science paper, in which the researchers described a new method of precisely targeting and cutting DNA in bacteria.

Two new papers published last week in the journal Science Express (1 , 2) demonstrate that the technique also works in human cells. A paper by Doudna and her team reporting similarly successful results in human cells has been accepted for publication by the new open-access journal eLife.

“The ability to modify specific elements of an organism’s genes has been essential to advance our understanding of biology, including human health,” said Doudna, a professor of molecular and cell biology and of chemistry and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator at UC Berkeley. “However, the techniques for making these modifications in animals and humans have been a huge bottleneck in both research and the development of human therapeutics.

“This is going to remove a major bottleneck in the field, because it means that essentially anybody can use this kind of genome editing or reprogramming to introduce genetic changes into mammalian or, quite likely, other eukaryotic systems.”

“I think this is going to be a real hit,” said George Church, professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and principal author of one of the Science Express papers. “There are going to be a lot of people practicing this method because it is easier and about 100 times more compact than other techniques.”

“Based on the feedback we’ve received, it’s possible that this technique will completely revolutionize genome engineering in animals and plants,” said Doudna, who also holds an appointment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. “It’s easy to program and could potentially be as powerful as the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).”

The latter technique made it easy to generate millions of copies of small pieces of DNA and permanently altered biological research and medical genetics.

Filed under Cas9 gene therapy DNA DNA cleavage bacteria genetics genome science

110 notes

Editing the genome with high precision
Researchers at MIT, the Broad Institute and Rockefeller University have developed a new technique for precisely altering the genomes of living cells by adding or deleting genes. The researchers say the technology could offer an easy-to-use, less-expensive way to engineer organisms that produce biofuels; to design animal models to study human disease; and  to develop new therapies, among other potential applications.
To create their new genome-editing technique, the researchers modified a set of bacterial proteins that normally defend against viral invaders. Using this system, scientists can alter several genome sites simultaneously and can achieve much greater control over where new genes are inserted, says Feng Zhang, an assistant professor of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and leader of the research team.
“Anything that requires engineering of an organism to put in new genes or to modify what’s in the genome will be able to benefit from this,” says Zhang, who is a core member of the Broad Institute and MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research.
Zhang and his colleagues describe the new technique in the Jan. 3 online edition of Science. Lead authors of the paper are graduate students Le Cong and Ann Ran.
Early efforts
The first genetically altered mice were created in the 1980s by adding small pieces of DNA to mouse embryonic cells. This method is now widely used to create transgenic mice for the study of human disease, but, because it inserts DNA randomly in the genome, researchers can’t target the newly delivered genes to replace existing ones.
In recent years, scientists have sought more precise ways to edit the genome. One such method, known as homologous recombination, involves delivering a piece of DNA that includes the gene of interest flanked by sequences that match the genome region where the gene is to be inserted. However, this technique’s success rate is very low because the natural recombination process is rare in normal cells.
More recently, biologists discovered that they could improve the efficiency of this process by adding enzymes called nucleases, which can cut DNA. Zinc fingers are commonly used to deliver the nuclease to a specific location, but zinc finger arrays can’t target every possible sequence of DNA, limiting their usefulness. Furthermore, assembling the proteins is a labor-intensive and expensive process.
Complexes known as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) can also cut the genome in specific locations, but these complexes can also be expensive and difficult to assemble.
Precise targeting
The new system is much more user-friendly, Zhang says. Making use of naturally occurring bacterial protein-RNA systems that recognize and snip viral DNA, the researchers can create DNA-editing complexes that include a nuclease called Cas9 bound to short RNA sequences. These sequences are designed to target specific locations in the genome; when they encounter a match, Cas9 cuts the DNA.
This approach can be used either to disrupt the function of a gene or to replace it with a new one. To replace the gene, the researchers must also add a DNA template for the new gene, which would be copied into the genome after the DNA is cut.
Each of the RNA segments can target a different sequence. “That’s the beauty of this — you can easily program a nuclease to target one or more positions in the genome,” Zhang says.
The method is also very precise — if there is a single base-pair difference between the RNA targeting sequence and the genome sequence, Cas9 is not activated. This is not the case for zinc fingers or TALEN. The new system also appears to be more efficient than TALEN, and much less expensive.
The new system “is a significant advancement in the field of genome editing and, in its first iteration, already appears comparable in efficiency to what zinc finger nucleases and TALENs have to offer,” says Aron Geurts, an associate professor of physiology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. “Deciphering the ever-increasing data emerging on genetic variation as it relates to human health and disease will require this type of scalable and precise genome editing in model systems.”
The research team has deposited the necessary genetic components with a nonprofit called Addgene, making the components widely available to other researchers who want to use the system. The researchers have also created a website with tips and tools for using this new technique.
Engineering new therapies
Among other possible applications, this system could be used to design new therapies for diseases such as Huntington’s disease, which appears to be caused by a single abnormal gene. Clinical trials that use zinc finger nucleases to disable genes are now under way, and the new technology could offer a more efficient alternative.
The system might also be useful for treating HIV by removing patients’ lymphocytes and mutating the CCR5 receptor, through which the virus enters cells. After being put back in the patient, such cells would resist infection.
This approach could also make it easier to study human disease by inducing specific mutations in human stem cells. “Using this genome editing system, you can very systematically put in individual mutations and differentiate the stem cells into neurons or cardiomyocytes and see how the mutations alter the biology of the cells,” Zhang says.
In the Science study, the researchers tested the system in cells grown in the lab, but they plan to apply the new technology to study brain function and diseases.

Editing the genome with high precision

Researchers at MIT, the Broad Institute and Rockefeller University have developed a new technique for precisely altering the genomes of living cells by adding or deleting genes. The researchers say the technology could offer an easy-to-use, less-expensive way to engineer organisms that produce biofuels; to design animal models to study human disease; and  to develop new therapies, among other potential applications.

To create their new genome-editing technique, the researchers modified a set of bacterial proteins that normally defend against viral invaders. Using this system, scientists can alter several genome sites simultaneously and can achieve much greater control over where new genes are inserted, says Feng Zhang, an assistant professor of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and leader of the research team.

“Anything that requires engineering of an organism to put in new genes or to modify what’s in the genome will be able to benefit from this,” says Zhang, who is a core member of the Broad Institute and MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research.

Zhang and his colleagues describe the new technique in the Jan. 3 online edition of Science. Lead authors of the paper are graduate students Le Cong and Ann Ran.

Early efforts

The first genetically altered mice were created in the 1980s by adding small pieces of DNA to mouse embryonic cells. This method is now widely used to create transgenic mice for the study of human disease, but, because it inserts DNA randomly in the genome, researchers can’t target the newly delivered genes to replace existing ones.

In recent years, scientists have sought more precise ways to edit the genome. One such method, known as homologous recombination, involves delivering a piece of DNA that includes the gene of interest flanked by sequences that match the genome region where the gene is to be inserted. However, this technique’s success rate is very low because the natural recombination process is rare in normal cells.

More recently, biologists discovered that they could improve the efficiency of this process by adding enzymes called nucleases, which can cut DNA. Zinc fingers are commonly used to deliver the nuclease to a specific location, but zinc finger arrays can’t target every possible sequence of DNA, limiting their usefulness. Furthermore, assembling the proteins is a labor-intensive and expensive process.

Complexes known as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) can also cut the genome in specific locations, but these complexes can also be expensive and difficult to assemble.

Precise targeting

The new system is much more user-friendly, Zhang says. Making use of naturally occurring bacterial protein-RNA systems that recognize and snip viral DNA, the researchers can create DNA-editing complexes that include a nuclease called Cas9 bound to short RNA sequences. These sequences are designed to target specific locations in the genome; when they encounter a match, Cas9 cuts the DNA.

This approach can be used either to disrupt the function of a gene or to replace it with a new one. To replace the gene, the researchers must also add a DNA template for the new gene, which would be copied into the genome after the DNA is cut.

Each of the RNA segments can target a different sequence. “That’s the beauty of this — you can easily program a nuclease to target one or more positions in the genome,” Zhang says.

The method is also very precise — if there is a single base-pair difference between the RNA targeting sequence and the genome sequence, Cas9 is not activated. This is not the case for zinc fingers or TALEN. The new system also appears to be more efficient than TALEN, and much less expensive.

The new system “is a significant advancement in the field of genome editing and, in its first iteration, already appears comparable in efficiency to what zinc finger nucleases and TALENs have to offer,” says Aron Geurts, an associate professor of physiology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. “Deciphering the ever-increasing data emerging on genetic variation as it relates to human health and disease will require this type of scalable and precise genome editing in model systems.”

The research team has deposited the necessary genetic components with a nonprofit called Addgene, making the components widely available to other researchers who want to use the system. The researchers have also created a website with tips and tools for using this new technique.

Engineering new therapies

Among other possible applications, this system could be used to design new therapies for diseases such as Huntington’s disease, which appears to be caused by a single abnormal gene. Clinical trials that use zinc finger nucleases to disable genes are now under way, and the new technology could offer a more efficient alternative.

The system might also be useful for treating HIV by removing patients’ lymphocytes and mutating the CCR5 receptor, through which the virus enters cells. After being put back in the patient, such cells would resist infection.

This approach could also make it easier to study human disease by inducing specific mutations in human stem cells. “Using this genome editing system, you can very systematically put in individual mutations and differentiate the stem cells into neurons or cardiomyocytes and see how the mutations alter the biology of the cells,” Zhang says.

In the Science study, the researchers tested the system in cells grown in the lab, but they plan to apply the new technology to study brain function and diseases.

Filed under genome genomic sequencing DNA genome-editing technique engineering cells science

685 notes


Would you make your DNA and health data public if it may help cure disease?
The 39-year-old Toronto professional is the brave or, perhaps, foolhardy Canadian volunteer who will be first to go public this week in a project that will reveal the coded secrets hidden in her genome, the six billion chemical units of her DNA.
They may include not only her susceptibility to diseases such as cancer but the levels of her propensities to alcoholism, depression or obesity, or even personality traits such as risk-taking. She will also provide the personal context required to make sense of the biological data – her age, height, weight; medical records; details about how she lives, works and plays; and even her photo if she’s game.
This information – everything but her name and address – will be placed on an online database that will be open and available to anyone in the world. Even in this digital age of perpetual show and tell, exposing oneself so completely amounts to a molecular full monty: Even without a name attached, any participant might be identifiable.
Ms. Davies is making a leap of faith that at least 100,000 of her fellow citizens are also being asked to take – even though Canadian law has no strict guidelines on how this confidential knowledge might be used or misused by any insurance company, employer, police force or identity thief.

Read more

Would you make your DNA and health data public if it may help cure disease?

The 39-year-old Toronto professional is the brave or, perhaps, foolhardy Canadian volunteer who will be first to go public this week in a project that will reveal the coded secrets hidden in her genome, the six billion chemical units of her DNA.

They may include not only her susceptibility to diseases such as cancer but the levels of her propensities to alcoholism, depression or obesity, or even personality traits such as risk-taking. She will also provide the personal context required to make sense of the biological data – her age, height, weight; medical records; details about how she lives, works and plays; and even her photo if she’s game.

This information – everything but her name and address – will be placed on an online database that will be open and available to anyone in the world. Even in this digital age of perpetual show and tell, exposing oneself so completely amounts to a molecular full monty: Even without a name attached, any participant might be identifiable.

Ms. Davies is making a leap of faith that at least 100,000 of her fellow citizens are also being asked to take – even though Canadian law has no strict guidelines on how this confidential knowledge might be used or misused by any insurance company, employer, police force or identity thief.

Read more

Filed under Personal Genome Project genetic sequence DNA genomics genetics science

171 notes




We all have hundreds of DNA flaws, UK geneticists say
Everyone has on average 400 flaws in their DNA, a UK study suggests. Most are “silent” mutations and do not affect health, although they can cause problems when passed to future generations. Others are linked to conditions such as cancer or heart disease, which appear in later life, say geneticists.
The evidence comes from the 1,000 Genomes project, which is mapping normal human genetic differences, from tiny changes in DNA to major mutations.
In the study, 1,000 seemingly healthy people from Europe, the Americas and East Asia had their entire genetic sequences decoded, to look at what makes people different from each other, and to help in the search for genetic links to diseases.
The new research, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, compared the genomes of 179 participants, who were healthy at the time their DNA was sampled, with a database of human mutations developed at Cardiff University.
It revealed that a normal healthy person has on average about 400 potentially damaging DNA variations, and two DNA changes known to be associated with disease.
"Ordinary people carry disease-causing mutations without them having any obvious effect," said Dr Chris Tyler-Smith, a lead researcher on the study from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge.
He added: “In a population there will be variants that have consequences for their own health.”
The research gives an insight into the “flaws that make us all different, sometimes with different expertise and different abilities, but also different predispositions in diseases,” said Prof David Cooper of Cardiff University, the other lead researcher of the study.

We all have hundreds of DNA flaws, UK geneticists say

Everyone has on average 400 flaws in their DNA, a UK study suggests. Most are “silent” mutations and do not affect health, although they can cause problems when passed to future generations. Others are linked to conditions such as cancer or heart disease, which appear in later life, say geneticists.

The evidence comes from the 1,000 Genomes project, which is mapping normal human genetic differences, from tiny changes in DNA to major mutations.

In the study, 1,000 seemingly healthy people from Europe, the Americas and East Asia had their entire genetic sequences decoded, to look at what makes people different from each other, and to help in the search for genetic links to diseases.

The new research, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, compared the genomes of 179 participants, who were healthy at the time their DNA was sampled, with a database of human mutations developed at Cardiff University.

It revealed that a normal healthy person has on average about 400 potentially damaging DNA variations, and two DNA changes known to be associated with disease.

"Ordinary people carry disease-causing mutations without them having any obvious effect," said Dr Chris Tyler-Smith, a lead researcher on the study from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge.

He added: “In a population there will be variants that have consequences for their own health.”

The research gives an insight into the “flaws that make us all different, sometimes with different expertise and different abilities, but also different predispositions in diseases,” said Prof David Cooper of Cardiff University, the other lead researcher of the study.

Filed under 1000 Genomes project DNA mutations variants diseases genetics neuroscience science

80 notes

Humans, Chimpanzees and Monkeys Share DNA but Not Gene Regulatory Mechanisms

Humans share over 90% of their DNA with their primate cousins. The expression or activity patterns of genes differ across species in ways that help explain each species’ distinct biology and behavior.

DNA factors that contribute to the differences were described on Nov. 6 at the American Society of Human Genetics 2012 meeting in a presentation by Yoav Gilad, Ph.D., associate professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago.

Dr. Gilad reported that up to 40% of the differences in the expression or activity patterns of genes between humans, chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys can be explained by regulatory mechanisms that determine whether and how a gene’s recipe for a protein is transcribed to the RNA molecule that carries the recipe instructions to the sites in cells where proteins are manufactured.

In addition to improving scientific understanding of the uniqueness of humans, studies such as the investigation conducted by Dr. Gilad and colleagues could have relevance to human health and disease.

"Through inter-species’ comparisons at the DNA sequence and expression levels, we hope to identify the genetic basis of human specific traits and in particular the genetic variations underlying the higher susceptibility to certain diseases such as malaria and cancer in humans than in non-human primates," said Dr. Gilad.

Dr. Gilad and his colleagues studied gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines, laboratory cultures of immortalized white blood cells, from eight humans, eight chimpanzees and eight rhesus monkeys.

They found that the distinct gene expression patterns of the three species can be explained by corresponding changes in genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that determine when and how a gene’s DNA code is transcribed to a messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule.

Dr. Gilad also determined that the epigenetics process known as histone modification also differs in the three species. The presence of histone marks during gene transcription indicates that the process is being prevented or modified.

"These data allowed us to identify both conserved and species-specific enhancer and repressor regulatory elements, as well as characterize similarities and differences across species in transcription factor binding to these regulatory elements," Dr. Gilad said.

Among the similarities among the three species were the promoter regions of DNA that initiated transcription of a particular gene.

In all three species, Dr. Gilad’s lab found that transcription factor binding and histone modifications were identical in over 67% of regulatory elements in DNA segments that are regarded as promoter regions.

The researchers presentation is titled, “Genome-wide comparison of genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in primates.”

(Source: sciencedaily.com)

Filed under primates humans DNA genes genetics neuroscience science

60 notes


Smoking and hyperactivity (ADHD) share common genetic risk factor
A variation of a particular gene may link the behaviours typical of childhood attention hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD for short, and those associated with smoking, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood (1, 2)
Childhood ADHD and subsequent smoking in adulthood frequently go hand in hand, say the authors, with people who have been diagnosed with ADHD more likely to start smoking early and to smoke twice as much as those without the condition.
The researchers focused on five variations in DNA sequences (single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs) in different genes that are strongly associated with different aspects of smoking behaviour, such as the number of cigarettes smoked every day, and taking up and quitting smoking.

Smoking and hyperactivity (ADHD) share common genetic risk factor

A variation of a particular gene may link the behaviours typical of childhood attention hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD for short, and those associated with smoking, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood (1, 2)

Childhood ADHD and subsequent smoking in adulthood frequently go hand in hand, say the authors, with people who have been diagnosed with ADHD more likely to start smoking early and to smoke twice as much as those without the condition.

The researchers focused on five variations in DNA sequences (single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs) in different genes that are strongly associated with different aspects of smoking behaviour, such as the number of cigarettes smoked every day, and taking up and quitting smoking.

Filed under ADHD smoking DNA genetics behavior performance neuroscience psychology science

free counters