Neuroscience

Articles and news from the latest research reports.

311 notes

The Split Brain of Honey Bees
Honey bees may have only a fraction of our neurons—just under a million versus our tens of billions—but our brains aren’t so different. Take sidedness. The human brain is divided into right and left sides—our right brain controls the left side of our body and vice versa. New research reveals that something similar happens in bees. When scientists removed the right or left antenna of honey bees, those insects with intact right antennae more quickly recognized bees from the same hive, stuck out their tongues (showing willingness to feed), and fended off invaders. Bees with just their left antennae took longer to recognize bees, didn’t want to feed, and mistook familiar bees for foreign ones. This suggests, the team concludes today in Scientific Reports, that bee brains have a sidedness just like ours do. The researchers also think that right antennae might control other bee behavior, like their sophisticated, mysterious "waggle dance" to indicate food. But there’s no buzz for the left-antennaed.

The Split Brain of Honey Bees

Honey bees may have only a fraction of our neurons—just under a million versus our tens of billions—but our brains aren’t so different. Take sidedness. The human brain is divided into right and left sides—our right brain controls the left side of our body and vice versa. New research reveals that something similar happens in bees. When scientists removed the right or left antenna of honey bees, those insects with intact right antennae more quickly recognized bees from the same hive, stuck out their tongues (showing willingness to feed), and fended off invaders. Bees with just their left antennae took longer to recognize bees, didn’t want to feed, and mistook familiar bees for foreign ones. This suggests, the team concludes today in Scientific Reports, that bee brains have a sidedness just like ours do. The researchers also think that right antennae might control other bee behavior, like their sophisticated, mysterious "waggle dance" to indicate food. But there’s no buzz for the left-antennaed.

Filed under split brain animal behavior honeybees social behavior neuroscience science

  1. anyachronist reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  2. yo-yo-chan-loves-you reblogged this from fuji-masaki
  3. fuji-masaki reblogged this from darknephilim
  4. darknephilim reblogged this from rainbow-hammock
  5. rainbow-hammock reblogged this from ophrys-apifera
  6. doctorbeeeeeeeeeeeeeees reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  7. msk-page reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  8. vanisherbee reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  9. underbeethlogic reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  10. giggleho reblogged this from somuchscience
  11. godhatesugly reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  12. katrillions reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  13. thoughtfully-thinking reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  14. biognosis reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  15. leonerdnimoy reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  16. travelingtinman reblogged this from scinerds
  17. ideasintransit reblogged this from anthrocentric
  18. koryos reblogged this from anthrocentric
  19. biologevie reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  20. iamgbtm reblogged this from anthrocentric
  21. anthrocentric reblogged this from scinerds
  22. treasuredleisure reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  23. quasiwhitegirl reblogged this from doonarose
  24. borrow-or-rob reblogged this from amandamals
free counters