Neuroscience

Articles and news from the latest research reports.

206 notes

Circadian rhythms control body’s response to intestinal infections
Circadian rhythms can boost the body’s ability to fight intestinal bacterial infections, UC Irvine researchers have found.
This suggests that targeted treatments may be particularly effective for pathogens such as salmonella that prompt a strong immune system response governed by circadian genes. It also helps explain why disruptions in the regular day-night pattern – as experienced by, say, night-shift workers or frequent fliers – may raise susceptibility to infectious diseases.
UC Irvine’s Paolo Sassone-Corsi, one of the world’s leading researchers on circadian rhythm genetics, and microbiologist Manuela Raffatellu led the study, which appears this week in the early online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Marina Bellet, a postdoctoral researcher from Italy’s University of Perugia also played a key role in the experiments.
“Although many immune responses are known to follow daily oscillations, the role of the circadian clock in the immune response to acute infections has not been understood,” said Sassone-Corsi, the Donald Bren Professor of Biological Chemistry. “What we’re learning is that the intrinsic power of the body clock can help fight infections.”
Circadian rhythms of 24 hours govern fundamental physiological functions in almost all organisms. The circadian clock is an intrinsic time-tracking system in the human body that anticipates environmental changes and adapts to the appropriate time of day. Disruption of these normal rhythms can profoundly influence people’s health.
Up to 15 percent of human genes are regulated by the day-night pattern of circadian rhythms, including those that respond to intestinal infections.
In tests on mice infected with salmonella, the researchers noted that circadian-controlled genes govern the immune response to the invading pathogen, leading to day-night differences in infection potential and in the immune system’s ability to deal with pathogens.
Mice are nocturnal, with circadian rhythms opposite those of humans. While important differences exist in the immune response of mice and humans, Sassone-Corsi said, these test results could provide clues to how circadian-controlled intestinal genes regulate daily changes in the effectiveness of the human immune system.
“Salmonella is a good pathogen to study what happens during infection,” said Raffatellu, assistant professor of microbiology & molecular genetics. “We think these findings may be broadly applicable to other infectious diseases in the gut, and possibly in other organs controlled by circadian patterns.”
Sassone-Corsi added that it’s important to understand the circadian genetics regulating immunity. “This gives us the ability to target treatments that supplement the power of the body clock to boost immune response,” he said.
(Image: Stephen Sedam / Los Angeles Times)

Circadian rhythms control body’s response to intestinal infections

Circadian rhythms can boost the body’s ability to fight intestinal bacterial infections, UC Irvine researchers have found.

This suggests that targeted treatments may be particularly effective for pathogens such as salmonella that prompt a strong immune system response governed by circadian genes. It also helps explain why disruptions in the regular day-night pattern – as experienced by, say, night-shift workers or frequent fliers – may raise susceptibility to infectious diseases.

UC Irvine’s Paolo Sassone-Corsi, one of the world’s leading researchers on circadian rhythm genetics, and microbiologist Manuela Raffatellu led the study, which appears this week in the early online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Marina Bellet, a postdoctoral researcher from Italy’s University of Perugia also played a key role in the experiments.

“Although many immune responses are known to follow daily oscillations, the role of the circadian clock in the immune response to acute infections has not been understood,” said Sassone-Corsi, the Donald Bren Professor of Biological Chemistry. “What we’re learning is that the intrinsic power of the body clock can help fight infections.”

Circadian rhythms of 24 hours govern fundamental physiological functions in almost all organisms. The circadian clock is an intrinsic time-tracking system in the human body that anticipates environmental changes and adapts to the appropriate time of day. Disruption of these normal rhythms can profoundly influence people’s health.

Up to 15 percent of human genes are regulated by the day-night pattern of circadian rhythms, including those that respond to intestinal infections.

In tests on mice infected with salmonella, the researchers noted that circadian-controlled genes govern the immune response to the invading pathogen, leading to day-night differences in infection potential and in the immune system’s ability to deal with pathogens.

Mice are nocturnal, with circadian rhythms opposite those of humans. While important differences exist in the immune response of mice and humans, Sassone-Corsi said, these test results could provide clues to how circadian-controlled intestinal genes regulate daily changes in the effectiveness of the human immune system.

“Salmonella is a good pathogen to study what happens during infection,” said Raffatellu, assistant professor of microbiology & molecular genetics. “We think these findings may be broadly applicable to other infectious diseases in the gut, and possibly in other organs controlled by circadian patterns.”

Sassone-Corsi added that it’s important to understand the circadian genetics regulating immunity. “This gives us the ability to target treatments that supplement the power of the body clock to boost immune response,” he said.

(Image: Stephen Sedam / Los Angeles Times)

Filed under circadian rhythms immune system intestinal infections salmonella medicine neuroscience science

  1. sulleye reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  2. rainbowsynthesis reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  3. brainangle reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  4. healthsagacity reblogged this from cosmic-rebirth
  5. y-storiwr reblogged this from cosmic-rebirth
  6. the-heartofthe-sun reblogged this from cosmic-rebirth
  7. cosmic-rebirth reblogged this from atemporal-emptiness
  8. jan3rdmix reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  9. pourcupinegloves reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  10. microjon reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  11. silas216 reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  12. badtzmarua reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  13. dermoosealini reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  14. andrewfindsawesomethings reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  15. bebraveandwin reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  16. masdvm reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  17. heavenbegatshell reblogged this from sagansense
  18. dookiefish reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  19. alleisella reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  20. luthienlefay reblogged this from neurosciencestuff and added:
    Oh yay this job is potentially killing me in yet another way.
  21. hypervisions reblogged this from literatureoftruth
free counters