Neuroscience

Articles and news from the latest research reports.

144 notes

Dragonflies have human-like ‘selective attention’
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey.
The discovery, published online in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates.
Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O’Carroll from the University of Adelaide’s Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years.
Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometres wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly’s brain that enables this selective attention.
They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell ‘locks on’ to one target and behaves as if the other targets don’t exist.
"Selective attention is fundamental to humans’ ability to select and respond to one sensory stimulus in the presence of distractions," Dr Wiederman says.
Associate Professor O’Carroll says this brain activity makes the dragonfly a more efficient and effective predator.
"Recent studies reveal similar mechanisms at work in the primate brain, but you might expect it there. We weren’t expecting to find something so sophisticated in lowly insects from a group that’s been around for 325 million years, Associate Professor O’Carroll says.
"We believe our work will appeal to neuroscientists and engineers alike. For example, it could be used as a model system for robotic vision. Because the insect brain is simple and accessible, future work may allow us to fully understand the underlying network of neurons and copy it into intelligent robots," he says.

Dragonflies have human-like ‘selective attention’

In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey.

The discovery, published online in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates.

Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O’Carroll from the University of Adelaide’s Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years.

Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometres wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly’s brain that enables this selective attention.

They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell ‘locks on’ to one target and behaves as if the other targets don’t exist.

"Selective attention is fundamental to humans’ ability to select and respond to one sensory stimulus in the presence of distractions," Dr Wiederman says.

Associate Professor O’Carroll says this brain activity makes the dragonfly a more efficient and effective predator.

"Recent studies reveal similar mechanisms at work in the primate brain, but you might expect it there. We weren’t expecting to find something so sophisticated in lowly insects from a group that’s been around for 325 million years, Associate Professor O’Carroll says.

"We believe our work will appeal to neuroscientists and engineers alike. For example, it could be used as a model system for robotic vision. Because the insect brain is simple and accessible, future work may allow us to fully understand the underlying network of neurons and copy it into intelligent robots," he says.

Filed under dragonflies selective attention insect vision brain cells neuron activity neuroscience science

  1. princessrocket reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  2. imaginariumofmatt reblogged this from blamoscience
  3. membranoproliferative reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  4. thatgingeranna reblogged this from opus-pocus
  5. opus-pocus reblogged this from exclusively-positive-press
  6. staryswiat reblogged this from gearsinthephoenix
  7. gearsinthephoenix reblogged this from exclusively-positive-press
  8. mackennzie reblogged this from fabulousfurfrou
  9. sevdolo reblogged this from exclusively-positive-press
  10. fabulousfurfrou reblogged this from exclusively-positive-press
  11. exclusively-positive-press reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  12. mostlywolves reblogged this from heysammy
  13. em-pt-ily reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  14. bananalynn reblogged this from onekarma
  15. fallupthestairs reblogged this from blamoscience
  16. dermoosealini reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  17. onekarma reblogged this from keepyourselfaware and added:
    couldn’t simply post a picture of a dragonfly; had to put a creepy scientist dude in the background, to prove that we’re...
  18. keepyourselfaware reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  19. sonofahitch reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  20. kanjakiss reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  21. loftkits reblogged this from neurosciencestuff and added:
    I knew those fuckers were flying into me on purpose.
  22. water-for-the-dead reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
free counters