Neuroscience

Articles and news from the latest research reports.

97 notes



Britain launches genome database for patients’ DNA
Up to 100,000 Britons suffering from cancer and rare diseases are to have their genetic codes fully sequenced and mapped as part of government plans to build a DNA database to boost drug discovery and development.
Prime Minister David Cameron said on Monday he wanted Britain to “push the boundaries” of scientific research by being the first country to introduce genetic sequencing into a mainstream health service.
His government has set aside 100 million pounds ($160 million) for the project in the taxpayer-funded National Health Service (NHS) over the next three to five years.
"Britain has often led the world in scientific breakthroughs and medical innovations, from the first CT scan and test-tube baby through to decoding DNA," he said in a statement.
"It is crucial that we continue to push the boundaries and this new plan will mean we are the first country in the world to use DNA codes in the mainstream of the health service."
The government said building a database of DNA profiles will give doctors more advanced understanding of a patient’s genetic make-up, their illness and their treatment needs. This should help those who are sick get access to the right drugs and more personalized care more quickly.
The database should also help scientists develop new drugs and other treatments which experts predict “could significantly reduce the number of premature deaths from cancer within a generation”, Cameron’s office said in a statement,
"By unlocking the power of DNA data, the NHS will lead the global race for better tests, better drugs and above all better care," Cameron said.
"If we get this right, we could transform how we diagnose and treat our most complex diseases not only here but across the world, while enabling our best scientists to discover the next wonder drug or breakthrough technology."

Britain launches genome database for patients’ DNA

Up to 100,000 Britons suffering from cancer and rare diseases are to have their genetic codes fully sequenced and mapped as part of government plans to build a DNA database to boost drug discovery and development.

Prime Minister David Cameron said on Monday he wanted Britain to “push the boundaries” of scientific research by being the first country to introduce genetic sequencing into a mainstream health service.

His government has set aside 100 million pounds ($160 million) for the project in the taxpayer-funded National Health Service (NHS) over the next three to five years.

"Britain has often led the world in scientific breakthroughs and medical innovations, from the first CT scan and test-tube baby through to decoding DNA," he said in a statement.

"It is crucial that we continue to push the boundaries and this new plan will mean we are the first country in the world to use DNA codes in the mainstream of the health service."

The government said building a database of DNA profiles will give doctors more advanced understanding of a patient’s genetic make-up, their illness and their treatment needs. This should help those who are sick get access to the right drugs and more personalized care more quickly.

The database should also help scientists develop new drugs and other treatments which experts predict “could significantly reduce the number of premature deaths from cancer within a generation”, Cameron’s office said in a statement,

"By unlocking the power of DNA data, the NHS will lead the global race for better tests, better drugs and above all better care," Cameron said.

"If we get this right, we could transform how we diagnose and treat our most complex diseases not only here but across the world, while enabling our best scientists to discover the next wonder drug or breakthrough technology."

Filed under UK genome plan DNA database genetic sequencing health genomics genetics science

  1. lutwentythree reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  2. azothian reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  3. drhfgordon reblogged this from neurosciencestuff and added:
    I can’t help but to see the slippery slope part of this database.
  4. ephemeral-end reblogged this from beneaththeflowers
  5. beneaththeflowers reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  6. scienceforkish reblogged this from stuckinsothoryos
  7. thisismyexcitedface reblogged this from biologynerdynerd
  8. biologynerdynerd reblogged this from theolduvaigorge
  9. lostvioletlotus reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  10. funeral-bell reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  11. saraahlynne reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  12. itdiditdoesitwill reblogged this from whatchuknowabouthatinhater
  13. youaretheonlyhope reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  14. pharmuscidea reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  15. pulpless-fiction reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  16. destinedreign reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  17. ironyiseverything reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  18. dewanajan reblogged this from theolduvaigorge
  19. ashleyavis reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  20. whatchuknowabouthatinhater reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  21. midnight-r0se reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  22. immadoubtingthomas reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  23. brainstufffyi4dew0319 reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  24. l-arcenciel reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  25. sanjaypishaan reblogged this from neurosciencestuff and added:
    I wonder if the USA will follow suit! This is actually a great idea!
  26. spookedpassage reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  27. csakai reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  28. brilliantstreet reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  29. paradoxicalparadigms reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
free counters