Neuroscience

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Re-Timer ready to reset sleep
Today saw the launch of Re-Timer, a wearable green light device invented by Flinders University sleep researchers to reset the body’s internal clock.
The portable device, which is worn like a pair of sunglasses and emits a soft green light onto the eyes, will help to counter jet lag, keep shift workers more alert and get teenagers out of bed by advancing or delaying sleeping patterns.
Psychologist Professor Leon Lack, the device’s chief inventor, said that the light from Re-Timer stimulates the part of the brain responsible for regulating the 24-hour body clock.
The device has been designed with the benefit of 25 years of sleep research at Flinders University.
“Body clocks or circadian rhythms influence the timing of all our sleeping and waking patterns, alertness, performance levels and metabolism,” Professor Lack said.
“Photoreceptors in our eyes detect sunlight, signal our brain to be awake and alert, and set our rhythms accordingly. These rhythms vary regularly over a 24-hour cycle. However, this process is often impaired by staying indoors, traveling to other times zones, working irregular hours, or a lack of sunlight during winter months.
“Our extensive research studies have shown that green light is one of the most effective wavelengths for advancing or delaying the body clock, and to date is the only wearable device using green light.”
Professor Lack recommended wearing the glasses for three days for 50 minutes each day either after awakening in the morning to advance the body clock, or before bed for those wanting to delay the body clock to wake up later.
He said that Re-Timer’s light therapy offers a safer and, in many cases, more effective treatment for mistimed sleep than drug alternatives.
The device is being produced by local manufacturing firm SMR Components.

Re-Timer ready to reset sleep

Today saw the launch of Re-Timer, a wearable green light device invented by Flinders University sleep researchers to reset the body’s internal clock.

The portable device, which is worn like a pair of sunglasses and emits a soft green light onto the eyes, will help to counter jet lag, keep shift workers more alert and get teenagers out of bed by advancing or delaying sleeping patterns.

Psychologist Professor Leon Lack, the device’s chief inventor, said that the light from Re-Timer stimulates the part of the brain responsible for regulating the 24-hour body clock.

The device has been designed with the benefit of 25 years of sleep research at Flinders University.

“Body clocks or circadian rhythms influence the timing of all our sleeping and waking patterns, alertness, performance levels and metabolism,” Professor Lack said.

“Photoreceptors in our eyes detect sunlight, signal our brain to be awake and alert, and set our rhythms accordingly. These rhythms vary regularly over a 24-hour cycle. However, this process is often impaired by staying indoors, traveling to other times zones, working irregular hours, or a lack of sunlight during winter months.

“Our extensive research studies have shown that green light is one of the most effective wavelengths for advancing or delaying the body clock, and to date is the only wearable device using green light.”

Professor Lack recommended wearing the glasses for three days for 50 minutes each day either after awakening in the morning to advance the body clock, or before bed for those wanting to delay the body clock to wake up later.

He said that Re-Timer’s light therapy offers a safer and, in many cases, more effective treatment for mistimed sleep than drug alternatives.

The device is being produced by local manufacturing firm SMR Components.

Filed under circadian rhythms body clock sleep wearable device neuroscience psychology science

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  4. wallacewan reblogged this from neurosciencestuff and added:
    is this another style google glass? Looks awful
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  10. conm4n reblogged this from neurosciencestuff and added:
    Oh my God I need this, my habits are wayyyyy off
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    Extremely intriguing….
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    The time has come
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