Neuroscience

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One neuron has huge impact on brain behaviour
Researchers from Queensland and the USA have made a unique discovery about how the brain computes sensory information.
The study by scientists at the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) at The University of Queensland (UQ) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in the USA was conducted to better understand how circuits of nerve cells underlie behaviour.
Using advanced optical imaging in animal models, the research team was able to pinpoint a single neuron in the neocortex that signaled sensory behavior. This led to the discovery that active processes in its thin dendritic appendages are responsible for implementing the integration of sensory and motor signals.
“We have long known that active dendrites provide neurons with powerful processing capabilities,” says QBI’s Associate Professor Stephen Williams, who collaborated on the study. “However, little has been known about the role of neuronal dendrites in behaviourally related circuit computations. “We were pleasantly surprised to discover that the dendrites of nerve cells operate during behaviour to implement the integration of sensory and motor signals,” he said.
Such multi-modal integration enables the brain to perform at lightning speed, allowing animals to react to their environment in relation to existing knowledge. The paper, titled ‘Nonlinear dendritic integration of sensory and motor input during an active sensing task’ was published in the prestigious journal, Nature.

One neuron has huge impact on brain behaviour

Researchers from Queensland and the USA have made a unique discovery about how the brain computes sensory information.

The study by scientists at the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) at The University of Queensland (UQ) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in the USA was conducted to better understand how circuits of nerve cells underlie behaviour.

Using advanced optical imaging in animal models, the research team was able to pinpoint a single neuron in the neocortex that signaled sensory behavior. This led to the discovery that active processes in its thin dendritic appendages are responsible for implementing the integration of sensory and motor signals.

“We have long known that active dendrites provide neurons with powerful processing capabilities,” says QBI’s Associate Professor Stephen Williams, who collaborated on the study. “However, little has been known about the role of neuronal dendrites in behaviourally related circuit computations. “We were pleasantly surprised to discover that the dendrites of nerve cells operate during behaviour to implement the integration of sensory and motor signals,” he said.

Such multi-modal integration enables the brain to perform at lightning speed, allowing animals to react to their environment in relation to existing knowledge. The paper, titled ‘Nonlinear dendritic integration of sensory and motor input during an active sensing task’ was published in the prestigious journal, Nature.

Filed under brain nerve cells neocortex dendrites neuroscience psychology science

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