Neuroscience

Articles and news from the latest research reports.

425 notes


When Your Eyes Tell Your Hands What to Think: You’re Far Less in Control of Your Brain Than You Think
You’ve probably never given much thought to the fact that picking up your cup of morning coffee presents your brain with a set of complex decisions. You need to decide how to aim your hand, grasp the handle and raise the cup to your mouth, all without spilling the contents on your lap.
A new Northwestern University study shows that, not only does your brain handle such complex decisions for you, it also hides information from you about how those decisions are made.
"Our study gives a salient example," said Yangqing ‘Lucie’ Xu, lead author of the study and a doctoral candidate in psychology at Northwestern. "When you pick up an object, your brain automatically decides how to control your muscles based on what your eyes provide about the object’s shape. When you pick up a mug by the handle with your right hand, you need to add a clockwise twist to your grip to compensate for the extra weight that you see on the left side of the mug.
"We showed that the use of this visual information is so powerful and automatic that we cannot turn it off. When people see an object weighted in one direction, they actually can’t help but ‘feel’ the weight in that direction, even when they know that we’re tricking them," Xu said.

When Your Eyes Tell Your Hands What to Think: You’re Far Less in Control of Your Brain Than You Think

You’ve probably never given much thought to the fact that picking up your cup of morning coffee presents your brain with a set of complex decisions. You need to decide how to aim your hand, grasp the handle and raise the cup to your mouth, all without spilling the contents on your lap.

A new Northwestern University study shows that, not only does your brain handle such complex decisions for you, it also hides information from you about how those decisions are made.

"Our study gives a salient example," said Yangqing ‘Lucie’ Xu, lead author of the study and a doctoral candidate in psychology at Northwestern. "When you pick up an object, your brain automatically decides how to control your muscles based on what your eyes provide about the object’s shape. When you pick up a mug by the handle with your right hand, you need to add a clockwise twist to your grip to compensate for the extra weight that you see on the left side of the mug.

"We showed that the use of this visual information is so powerful and automatic that we cannot turn it off. When people see an object weighted in one direction, they actually can’t help but ‘feel’ the weight in that direction, even when they know that we’re tricking them," Xu said.

Filed under brain decision-making neuroscience psychology vision perception science

  1. rlfrules reblogged this from rafaellovesthisshit
  2. rafaellovesthisshit reblogged this from derekbair
  3. derekbair reblogged this from a-wild-shey
  4. a-wild-shey reblogged this from heartcramp
  5. marcohasamagicaltongue reblogged this from canadiangirlnamedauto
  6. heartcramp reblogged this from canadiangirlnamedauto
  7. canadiangirlnamedauto reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  8. science-sexual reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  9. timelordcurse reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  10. angelo-saxon reblogged this from neurosciencestuff and added:
    That’s a really scary thought. That I literally can’t override my brain. But… I am my brain. My brain is thinking that...
  11. azelie reblogged this from nutopiancitizen
  12. cleverwaysoflearning reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  13. sherlockhasthephonebox reblogged this from scinerds
  14. khthonic reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  15. drmufasa reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  16. cornwankies reblogged this from puke-ahontas
  17. forthedeafandthemute reblogged this from iamsancho
  18. iamsancho reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  19. randombantam reblogged this from scinerds
  20. noobftw reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  21. captain-of-the-mothership reblogged this from fahraemizta
  22. pirateprincessx1 reblogged this from vikingbitch
  23. skeletontoes reblogged this from neurosciencestuff
  24. gifte reblogged this from feedthecrows
  25. vikingbitch reblogged this from 67000mph
  26. iwillteachyouhowtofly reblogged this from culturerevo
  27. trillazzsheeka reblogged this from culturerevo
  28. 67000mph reblogged this from culturerevo
  29. oneofthepaths reblogged this from scinerds
  30. parameterchild reblogged this from culturerevo
free counters